What’s Your AQ?

Test your knowledge on the top anaphylaxis questions.

Jerome Bettis, aka The Bus, is a former pro football running back and severe allergy sufferer. He knows that people have lots of questions about anaphylaxis, which is why he's a fan of What's Your AQ? It's a quiz based on conversations with people at risk for anaphylaxis and their caregivers, as well as secondary research. So it has important information that can help you be informed and prepared in case of a severe allergic reaction.

Accuracy

    • Test your AQ, or anaphylaxis quotient, by taking the What's Your AQ? quiz to find answers to recurring questions and get valuable information on managing and treating severe allergic reactions.

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    • Anaphylaxis is:

      A A life‑threatening allergic reaction B A skin reaction C A seasonal allergy



      Anaphylaxis is:

      A A life‑threatening allergic reaction

      Explanation: Anaphylaxis is a serious allergic reaction that happens quickly and may cause death. Anaphylaxis can occur as a result of exposure to allergens including foods, insect bites, latex, and medication, among other allergens and causes. The eight most common food allergens are peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, fish, wheat, soy, dairy, and eggs. The best prevention method for anaphylaxis is avoidance of the specific allergen(s).

      Next question


    • True or False:
      A person must always display at least two symptoms
      for an allergic reaction to be considered anaphylaxis.

      A True B False

      True or False:
      A person must always display at least two symptoms
      for an allergic reaction to be considered anaphylaxis.

      B False

      Explanation: When a person has been exposed to a known allergen, the single symptom of reduced blood pressure leading to weakness or fainting is a sign that anaphylaxis is likely occurring. But the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis can vary from person to person and from one episode to the next. Anaphylaxis is also likely to be occurring when a person who has been exposed to a known allergen has symptoms involving the skin, nose, mouth, or gastrointestinal tract (such as vomiting, diarrhea, or cramping) in combination with difficulty breathing or reduced blood pressure (such as paleness, weak pulse, confusion, or loss of consciousness). If a person comes into contact with a suspected allergen, anaphylaxis is likely to be occurring if they experience two or more of the following symptoms: skin symptoms or swollen lips, difficulty breathing, reduced blood pressure, or gastrointestinal symptoms.

      Next question


    • Which of the following can be a trigger of anaphylaxis?

      A Insect stings B Exercise C Medications D All of the above




      Which of the following can be a trigger of anaphylaxis?

      D All of the above

      Explanation: Common causes of anaphylaxis include food, drugs, insect stings, latex, and exercise. For kids and young adults, the most common cause is food. For older adults, medications and insect bites are more common. Vigorous activities such as jogging, tennis, and bicycling can cause anaphylaxis in some people. Surprisingly, there are still a large number of anaphylactic reactions reported for which the cause can't be identified.

      Next question




    • Is a “nut” allergy the same as a “peanut” allergy?

      A Yes B No




      Is a “nut” allergy the same as a “peanut” allergy?

      B No

      Explanation: Peanuts are not the same as tree nuts (almonds, cashews, walnuts, etc.), which grow on trees. Peanuts grow underground and are part of a different plant family known as legumes.

      Next question


    • True or False:
      Food manufacturers are required to warn consumers
      if a product is made on shared equipment with one
      of the top eight major food allergens or if the product
      is made in the same facility as one of these allergens.

      A True B False

      True or False:
      Food manufacturers are required to warn consumers
      if a product is made on shared equipment with one
      of the top eight major food allergens or if the product
      is made in the same facility as one of these allergens.

      B False

      Explanation: US food labels are required to indicate if a food product actually contains any of the eight major food allergens which include peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, fish, wheat, soy, milk and eggs. However, there are currently no laws requiring labels to clarify if a product is "made in the same facility as" or "made on the same equipment as" (i.e. may contain) an allergen or to warn consumers of the potential cross‑contamination risks of their products. The inclusion of "may contain" statements on labels is completely voluntary.

      Next question



    • True or False:
      Taking an antihistamine in response to an anaphylactic
      reaction instead of immediately administering epinephrine
      is an appropriate treatment option for anaphylaxis.

      A True B False

      True or False:
      Taking an antihistamine in response to an anaphylactic
      reaction instead of immediately administering epinephrine
      is an appropriate treatment option for anaphylaxis.

      B False

      Explanation: Epinephrine, the medicine contained In Auvi‑QTM (epinephrine injection, USP), is the recommended first‑line treatment for life‑threatening allergic reactions. The guidelines established by the World Allergy Organization (WAO) and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) state that antihistamines should not be substituted for epinephrine. If you or someone near you experiences an anaphylactic reaction, you should administer epinephrine using an epinephrine auto‑injector, like Auvi‑Q, as directed by a doctor. Always seek immediate medical attention to make certain your reaction is under control. It may be necessary to use a second dose of epinephrine, so make sure a backup is always ready. More than two sequential doses of epinephrine should only be administered under direct medical supervision.

      Next question


    • In the event of an anaphylactic reaction, when
      should a person administer epinephrine?

      A Before experiencing an allergic reaction B As soon as they begin experiencing symptoms of anaphylaxis C Five to ten minutes following the initial onset of symptoms of a severe allergic reaction


      In the event of an anaphylactic reaction, when
      should a person administer epinephrine?

      B As soon as they begin experiencing symptoms of anaphylaxis

      Explanation: As soon as someone begins to experience symptoms of anaphylaxis, the three things they should do right away are remove the allergen, inject epinephrine using an epinephrine auto‑injector, like Auvi‑QTM (epinephrine injection, USP), and seek immediate medical attention. Severe allergic reactions can be life threatening if not treated immediately. It may be necessary to use a second dose of epinephrine, so they should make sure a backup is always ready. Finally, they should immediately seek medical attention to make certain their reaction is under control.

      Next question



    • True or False:
      After administration of epinephrine to treat
      anaphylaxis, a patient should be monitored at home.

      A True B False



      True or False:
      After administration of epinephrine to treat
      anaphylaxis, a patient should be monitored at home.

      B False

      Explanation: Patients should proceed to the emergency room in case additional treatment or monitoring is needed to manage the severe allergic reaction, not because epinephrine has been administered.

      Next question
    • Where on the body should an injection of
      epinephrine be given?

      A Buttocks B Outer thigh C Upper arm D Anywhere — it doesn't matter



      Where on the body should an injection of
      epinephrine be given?

      B Outer thigh

      Explanation: Epinephrine should only be injected into the middle of the outer thigh, through clothing if necessary. It's important for anyone who is prescribed an epinephrine auto‑injector to become familiar with how to use it. An Auvi‑QTM (epinephrine injection, USP) prescription pack includes a trainer that contains no drug that is provided for practicing administration. Patients should practice with the trainer until the process becomes second nature. Teach others how to use it as well.

      Next question



    • True or False:
      A person at risk for anaphylaxis only needs to carry one epinephrine auto‑injector with him/her.

      A True B False

      True or False:
      A person at risk for anaphylaxis only needs to carry one epinephrine auto‑injector with him/her.

      B False

      Explanation: A person at risk for anaphylaxis should always carry two epinephrine auto‑injectors, like Auvi‑QTM (epinephrine injection, USP), as it may be necessary to use a second dose if symptoms persist or if symptoms return following the first successful dose of epinephrine. Epinephrine should be administered every 5 to 15 minutes, as necessary, and more than two sequential doses of epinephrine should only be administered under direct medical supervision. Always seek immediate medical attention after use to make certain your reaction is under control.

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    Indication

    Auvi‑Q™ (epinephrine injection, USP) is used to treat life-threatening allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) in people who are at risk for or have a history of these reactions.

    Important Safety Information

    Auvi-Q is for immediate self (or caregiver) administration and does not take the place of emergency medical care. Seek immediate medical treatment after use. Each Auvi-Q contains a single dose of epinephrine. Auvi‑Q should only be injected into your outer thigh. DO NOT INJECT INTO BUTTOCK OR INTRAVENOUSLY. If you accidentally inject Auvi‑Q into any other part of your body, seek immediate medical treatment. Epinephrine should be used with caution if you have heart disease or are taking certain medicines that can cause heart‑related (cardiac) symptoms.

    If you take certain medicines, you may develop serious life-threatening side effects from epinephrine. Be sure to tell your doctor all the medicines you take, especially medicines for asthma. Side effects may be increased in patients with certain medical conditions, or who take certain medicines. These include asthma, allergies, depression, thyroid disease, Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease.

    The most common side effects may include increase in heart rate, stronger or irregular heartbeat, sweating, nausea and vomiting, difficulty breathing, paleness, dizziness, weakness or shakiness, headache, apprehension, nervousness, or anxiety. These side effects go away quickly, especially if you rest.

    You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

    Please click here for full Prescribing Information.

    The health information contained herein is provided for general educational purposes only. Your healthcare professional is the single best source of information
    regarding your health. Please consult your healthcare professional if you have any questions about your health or treatment.

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